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Landscape regeneration lessons learned from Mulloon Creek

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Author P Hazell, C Wilson and C Hall

Description

Every mine is situated within a water catchment – a catchment with potentially many other land uses. A mine may take up a relatively small area in that catchment, but its operations have the potential to affect the whole catchment and long after that mine has ceased to operate. Therefore, the residents of any given catchment have the right to feel secure in the knowledge that their catchment, and indeed the wider environment, will not be degraded by mining activities. Much conflict can arise when this confidence does not exist.

But, imagine if a community not only felt confident that their catchment would not be degraded by mining activities, but was also confident that their catchment would be left in a better and continuously improving condition – with improving water quality, biodiversity and soil – and a strengthening, more resilient economy.

CITATION:

Hazell, P, Wilson, C and Hall, C, 2018. Landscape regeneration lessons learned from Mulloon Creek, in Proceedings Life-of-Mine 2018, pp 125–126 (The Australasian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy: Melbourne).